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Carbon dating and the turin shroud

carbon dating and the turin shroud-46

"We cannot say anything more on its origin." The new findings don't rule out either the notion that the long strip of linen is a medieval forgery or that it's the true burial shroud of Jesus Christ, the researchers said. 1390, lending credence to the notion that it was an elaborate fake created in the Middle Ages.

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"Apart from ruling out the United States of America as the source for the shroud, it leaves just about everything else open," Farey said.The new study suffers from the same issues that made past studies of pollen on the shroud unreliable, said Renée Enevold, a geoscientist at the Moesgaard Museum in Denmark who has analyzed ancient pollen in the past."The plant DNA could be from many sources, and there is no way of finding the right source," Enevold told Live Science in an email.To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies.If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. A new analysis of DNA from the Shroud of Turin reveals that people from all over the world have touched the venerated garment.

"Individuals from different ethnic groups and geographical locations came into contact with the Shroud [of Turin] either in Europe (France and Turin) or directly in their own lands of origin (Europe, northeast Africa, Caucasus, Anatolia, Middle East and India)," study lead author Gianni Barcaccia, a geneticist at the University of Padua in Italy and lead author of the new study describing the DNA analysis, said in an email.

"Also, the sub-genus level of taxon that has been reached is not near enough to the species level that is needed to determine the area of origin for each plant." The researchers also mistakenly relied on an interpretative method that is used to analyze thousands of grains of pollen in a lake, she said.

In that environment, the conditions that led to the deposition of pollen — rain and wind, for instance — are known.

In contrast, there are so many unknowns when it comes to describing how dust settled onto the shroud.

"It is very bold and completely wrong to use the same interpretational approach on the presence of DNA — or just a few pollen grains, for that matter — on a shroud that has been man-handled for decades," Enevold said.

Though the Catholic Church has never taken an official stance on the object's authenticity, tens of thousands flock to Turin, Italy, every year to get a glimpse of the object, believing that it wrapped the bruised and bleeding body of Jesus Christ after his crucifixion. 1204, the cloth was smuggled to safety in Athens, Greece, where it stayed until A. Centuries later, in the 1980s, radiocarbon dating, which measures the rate at which different isotopes of the carbon atoms decay, suggested the shroud was made between A. What's more, the Gospel of Matthew notes that "the earth shook, the rocks split and the tombs broke open" after Jesus was crucified.