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Her father, Gabriel Heti, was an electrical engineer, and her mother worked as a pathologist.

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One of the co-directors, Erin Brubacher, makes an announcement. “She was afraid that if she came and heard it, she’d be tempted to rewrite the script.” Heti has been rewriting the script for years—since long before her 2010 novel, The protagonist is, like her creator, a writer named Sheila who lives in Toronto and is deeply embedded in the arts scene.“She didn’t seem afraid of much or of trying new things.” In high school, she made a bunch of one-page feminist zines and taped them up in the halls; for this, she was called into the principal’s office. The final product (“sexual abuse and sex and all the stuff people were writing about in their riot grrl zines”) was not to the publisher’s liking, however, and never went to print.So began a lifetime of rejection from the mainstream, something Heti wears today as a badge of pride, as does her brother.She is sociable and gracious, but as much as she reveals herself in her fiction—or seems to—she is quick to note that there’s a part of her that won’t be exposed.“That author Elena Ferrante,” she says, “I love that you can’t find out anything about her.The storyline is clear enough: two families meet accidentally while on holiday in Paris, where one of the families loses its twelve-year-old son.

However, the work strives for none of the verisimilitude of , with its dialogue lifted from real life.

That play both is and isn’t , just as the Sheila character both is and isn’t Sheila Heti. Inspired by reality TV shows, offers the illusion of transparency, without providing transparency—much like Heti herself.

In addition to being a writer, Heti is the architect of a number of collaborative projects, including Trampoline Hall, a consistently sold-out monthly lecture series held at a bar in Toronto.

She is working with artist Ted Mineo on a translation of the Within the literary community, Heti is a polarizing figure, either heralded as a genius or dismissed as overrated.

“Her greatest talent is convincing people she has talent,” one writer told me. Over the course of her relatively short career, Heti has become a symbol of different things to different people: she’s the embodiment of a certain of-the-moment whimsical faddishness; a globally relevant artist who broke free of the usual Canadian constraints and never looked back; a feminist admirable for depicting women’s psyches honestly; and the cool kid who made of her charmed life a myth, and thus became someone to envy and emulate—or to envy and disdain.

In 2013, it enjoyed a two-week sold-out run in the same Kensington Market space that is now being used for a run-through.