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Racial patterns dating marriages

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Men who earned a bachelor’s degree were more likely to marry than men with less education.

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Men and women who did not complete high school were less likely to marry than were men and women with more education.In their 2007 study, Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers used data from the 2001 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine marriage and divorce patterns up to age 45 for cohorts born in 1940–19–1955.A comparison of the two cohorts shows that the likelihood of marriage declined, the average age at first marriage increased by 1 year, and married couples were more likely to divorce in the latter cohort.Cultural norms changed in ways that decreased the aversion to being single and increased the probability of cohabitation.Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79)—a survey of people born during the 1957–1964 period—this study examines the marriage and divorce patterns for a cohort of young baby boomers up to age 46.In particular, the study focuses on differences in marriage and divorce patterns by educational attainment and by age at marriage.

This work is descriptive and does not attempt to explain causation or why marriage patterns differ across groups.

The Council on Contemporary Families is a non-profit, non-partisan organization of family researchers, mental health and social practitioners, and clinicians dedicated to providing the press and public with the latest research and best practice findings about American families.

For information on interracial dating and same-sex couples, contact Mignon R. For more information on interracial dating, including online and other ways that couples “make connections” contact Pamela Anne Quiroz, Professor of Public Policy and Sociology at University of Illinois at Chicago at [email protected] 708-769-2890.

About 85 percent of the NLSY79 cohort married by age 46, and among those who married, a sizeable fraction, almost 30 percent, married more than once.

The bulk of marriages occurred by age 28, with relatively few marriages taking place at age 35 or older.

Stevenson and Wolfers found stark differences in marriage patterns between racial groups and between education groups for the 1950–1955 birth cohort: Blacks married later and at lower rates compared with Whites.